Stay Alert offers confidential, convenient reporting system

Students+receive+Stay+Alert+bookmarks+with+contact+information+at+class+meetings+at+the+beginning+of+the+school+year.

Jamie Abbott

Students receive Stay Alert bookmarks with contact information at class meetings at the beginning of the school year.

Jamie Abbott, Staff Reporter

Using the Stay Alert program, students can confidentially report any school-related dangerous information or criminal behavior for school staff to resolve.

Students can make statements by call, text, a report online or an e-mail to [email protected] Assistant principal Steve Singleton said this method will allow students to report conveniently as well as confidentially.

“We’re on our phones so much,” Singleton said. “You can get on your phone and make a report without anyone knowing if something is going on. It gives students confidentiality and private peace of mind without feeling like there is going to be retaliation.”

Stay Alert can be used for vandalism, bullying, drugs, alcohol or student-teacher conflict.

It gives students confidentiality and private peace of mind.”

— Steve Singleton, Assistant Principal

“It can even be something as light as having conflicts with a teacher, and they can come meet with a counselor,” Singleton said. “It really is not limited at all. It can be whatever the student wants to report.”

Students are introduced to the program initially as freshmen, and they are reminded every year at class meetings to put the number 1-206-406-6485 into their contact lists.

“We really talk a lot more to our freshman about it than our other classes,” Singleton said. “We start with them and explain it to them.”

Once a report is made, school staff receives it and reacts to whatever information has been disclosed. Singleton said students can use the system as needed and are also still welcome to report problems in person.

If kids see something they feel isn’t conducive to the learning environment we enjoy here at Canyon High, we encourage them to let us know so we can address it,” Singleton said. “Mostly, we really like that face to face conversation, but we also understand sometimes that’s just not possible.”