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Filed under Opinion, Recent Posts

Sarahah’s honesty not the best policy

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No one is quite sure how to pronounce it, but everyone knows what it is. It’s the thing that keeps you on your toes, in the dark and wanting more. It roughly means “honesty” in Arabic, and it is called Sarahah.

Released on June 13, Sarahah has quickly found itself in many circles. Sarahah advertises itself as an app which “helps you in discovering your strengths and areas for improvement by receiving honest feedback from employees and friends in a private manner.

While the app is meant to be a source for professional constructive criticism, it doesn’t often come off that way. Sarahah opens the door to potential issues by giving its users the ability to say whatever they choose. The anonymity allows people complete freedom, and more often than not, that power is abused. All users are at risk of receiving hurtful or inappropriate messages. People may receive some positive comments in the mix, but hardly any fall under the category of helpful. It is not worth the trouble of shifting through a dozen negative comments for a single good one.

Created for honesty, it seems ironic that the app lacks so much of it.”

— Claire Meyer, 10

Many in our generation are obsessed with the way they appear to others rather than doing things for their own happiness. Sarahah has made indulging ourselves for superficial compliments much easier. The temptation of knowing what people think of you is understandable, but by using Sarahah, half of the puzzle is missing. It leaves users guessing about who thinks what. Created for honesty, it seems ironic that the app lacks so much of it. While this may be considered part of the fun of Sarahah, it seems to cause more problems than it solves, such as bullying or drama.

Sarahah holds some merits. It allows people to be truthful in a safe environment without feeling embarrassed or ashamed. As long as people know what they are getting themselves into, it can be freeing to hear a different viewpoint. However, if people feel they must express their opinions, they should be able to put their name to it and stand behind it. Our world is shrouded in dishonesty, so when it comes to daily relationships, it is important for people to be accountable for what they say to others.

It’s easy to see why Sarahah has become so popular, but people should live for themselves, not others. Besides that, sometimes things are just better left unknown.

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1 Comment

One Response to “Sarahah’s honesty not the best policy”

  1. Chandler Goldreyer on October 24th, 2017 8:36 am

    Good job on this article!! I’m in news magazine at my school and we’re reviewing award-winning school news sites because we’re planning to make a website, too. I think this article is written very well.

    [Reply]

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Sarahah’s honesty not the best policy